Tag: Taylor Creek Park

Fading

I’ve lived long enough in Toronto to remember brighter days, when the city was described as “New York run by the Swiss”. Before decades of infrastructure neglect, enshrined through the selfish parsimony of the electorate, and the cowardice of elected officials. In today’s images, even though the park and the bridge are still in use, there is still to my eyes an atmosphere of neglect. All images created with Nikon F3, 28mm/2.8 Nikkor lens. Rollei Retro 80s film developed in Rodinal and toned in post.

Taylor Creen F3 80s 8-16017-EditTaylor Creen F3 80s 8-16027-Edit

Taylor Creen F3 80s 8-16018-Edit

Taylor Creen F3 80s 8-16016-Edit

Plant in the Light

Another image from Taylor Creek Park. Shooting the Helios 44 wide open gave a soft effect that I quite like for a lot of the plant

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Canon Rebel TI with 58mm F2 Helios 44 lens mounted via an adapter
Polypan F film exposed at EI 50,
developed in Xtol 1+1.5 for 9 minutes @ 20 C

Experimentation

Yesterday was a bright sunny day, and I probably should have known better than to go out with Eastman SO-331, a special purpose duplicating film with almost impossible to control contrast. Amidst the soot and whitewash I did get an image that turned out OK, and the fact that this film stock has no anti-halation layer made for some interesting glow effects.

Eastman SO 331 in Rodinal

Nikon F4S body, 50mm/3.5 Micro-Nikkor lens
SO-331 stand developed 1 hour in Rodinal 1+150 @ 20 C

The Park In the Evening

Taylor Creek Park (close to home in Toronto) is so lovely on an early summer evening 🙂

Early Evening in Taylor Creek

 

Voigtlander Bessa R, 35mm/2.5 Voigtlander Lens,
Rollei Retro 80s film developed in Rodinal 1+50 for 14 minutes @ 20 C

An Infrared Outing

This past Saturday I went to nearby Taylor Creek Park to shoot some Rollei Retro 80s film (with my Rolleiflex). One of the advantages of this film is that if you use an infrared filter (such as an IR 72 that looks almost completely opaque to the naked eye) you can do infrared photography, and I just love the ghostly, otherworldly look you get when doing this.

The Rolleiflex is a perfect camera for infrared: as a twin lens reflex camera, the viewing lens is not covered by the filter so focussing is never an issue. On a single lens reflex camera, the filter must keep coming off (for focusing/composition) and on (shooting).

Taylor Creek Infrared

Taylor Creek Infrared

Taylor Creek Infrared

 

All images taken with Rolleiflex E3, 75mm/3.5 Xenotar lens with IR72 filter
Exposure 1/2 to 1 second @ f16, on Rollei Retro 80s film
Film developed in Rodinal 1+50 for 14 minutes @ 20 C